Adverti

In: Miscellaneous

Submitted By loretta
Words 518
Pages 3
t 2010 PRODUCTION SPECIFICATIONS

Acceptable Advertising File Formats ~ PDF is the preferred format for ad files
PleASe note • On bleed pages, hold all live matter 5/16” (8mm) within trim edges on all trim sides. • Headlines running across the gutter should split between words, not letters. tonAl DenSity • 2-color: The sum percentage of tonal values should not exceed 160%; only one color may be solid. The maximum screen tone value for any one color should not exceed 85%; a required value over 85% should be made solid. • 4-color: The sum of the tone values should not exceed 300%. No more than one solid should be used. ProoFing* • For best reproduction, digital proofs of each ad must accompany files. • All proofs should meet SWOP standards. FUrniSHeD inSertS Check with publisher on all insert matters, specifications, quantity needed, and shipping address.
8 1/4” x 11” 8” x 10 3/4” 16 1/4” x 11” 16” x 10 3/4” 209mm x 279mm 203mm x 273mm 413mm x 279mm 406mm x 273mm

Ad Size / non Bleed Two page spread Full page 2/3 page 1/2 page horizontal 1/2 page island 1/3 page square 1/3 page vertical 15” x 10” 7” x 10” 4 1/2” x 10” 7” x 4 7/8” 4 1/2” x 7 1/2” 4 1/2” x 4 7/8” 2 3/16” x 10” 381 mm x 254mm 178mm x 254mm 114mm x 254mm 178mm x 124mm 114mm x 190mm 114mm x 124mm 55mm x 254mm

Ad Size / Bleed Full page bleed Full page (trim size) Double page spread Double page spread (trim size)

SenD MAteriAlS to: Brian Gill, Production Department Institutional Investor 225 Park Avenue South, 7th floor, New York, NY 10003 Tel: (212) 224-3740 Fax: (212) 224-3704 Email: bgill@iimagazine.com note All ad files and proofs will be held for one year and then discarded unless otherwise requested in writing.

1 page non- bleed 7” x 10” 178mm x 254mm

2/3 page 4 1/2” x 10” 114mm x 254mm

1/2 pg. horizontal 7” x 4 7/8” 178mm x 124mm

1/2 page island 4 1/2” x 7 1/2” 114mm x 190mm…...

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