Chocolate Industry

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Reference: Position Title: Classification: Salary range: Location: Division: Branch: Section: Status: Applicants: 11681 Project Office Administrator APS Level 6 (Administrative Service Officer Class 6) $68,669 - $77,002 per annum, plus an additional 15.4% superannuation 700 Collins Street, Docklands, Melbourne 3008 Research and Systems Observations and Engineering Business Process and Projects Ongoing Australian Citizenship – see Eligibility Requirements

Applications close: Thursday, 3 June 2010

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Make a difference to Australian weather and climate services. Join a team that delivers on technical projects that matter. Apply your skills and experience to support important projects at the Bureau of Meteorology. Working closely with 3-4 project managers at a time, your organisational and communications skills and your finance experience will contribute to the success of various project teams. As an integral member of a new Project Support Office, you will support existing projects and have the opportunity to establish or improve services for new projects.

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Under general direction, 1. Establish and maintain systems to record and report on project costs pertinent to client project or Section requirements, using the Bureau SAP accounting system. Coordinate meetings and prepare meeting records, and assist in the compilation, production and maintenance of project reports and other documents and records. Update web based material or other documents, such as project status reports, document or process templates, or guidance documents, and support effective communication within and external to project teams. Advise and assist project managers and team members in the application of project procedures and tools and recording and reporting standards. Undertake other administrative tasks as required by project managers or Section…...

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Slavery in the Chocolate Industry

...Slavery in the Chocolate Industry Introduction The forced labour of children in the Ivorian cocoa farms is at a distance from the glamourised candy producers such as Mars and Nestlé, and a universe away from the day-to-day consumers of chocolate. That such a quixotic market shares a commonality with the more exposed diamond market, for example, whose implication in the sale and involvement of guns in tribal cleansing has long been documented, drives home the reminder that our modern prosperity, usually reached and used with the best of consumer intentions, if not also the corporate, and even our harmless, insignificant indulgences sometimes owe themselves to an extremely complex source environment. In this paper we dissect the impasse of a much-loved industry's unpleasant, inadvertent underside in an objective and comprehensive method, rigorously applying the ancient, contemporary, and modern theories of ethics in our analysis, and drawing on practical precedents and goings-on in the business world to reinforce abstraction with cases and results. SYNOPSIS Slavery is not an ancient artifact in our time, but a concealed certainty. Only 81 of the world's near 200 countries are signatories of United Nations legislation to actively fight against slavery (51) in the twenty-first century. Velasquez values the domestic American chocolate market at $13 billion, a figure made possible by trading in more than half a million tons of chocolate's source crop (cocoa beans) in...

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