Equiano

In: English and Literature

Submitted By bwcorrig
Words 286
Pages 2
I think we find Equiano’s story to be so interesting for two different reasons. The first reason being that nobody has ever really read anything like this before. The story about the journey of a slave from start to finish was not experienced before by the white audience who would be reading this narrative. This was an alien thing to them and would immediately catch the reader’s attention. The other main reason I believe the reader will find Equiano’s story to be interesting is because of the slave to free man type story he explains. His story reminds me so much of the “American dream” or your typical “rags to riches” type of story. This slave was able to sell his goods on the side of being a slave and eventually save enough of his money to buy his freedom from his master. He was an extremely hard worker who had a dream of one day being a free man and he was able to accomplish this dream. His master kept his word and let Equiano gain his freedom. One of my favorite parts of chapter seven is when Equiano is describing what it is like to have his freedom, he comments after his master lets him go free saying, “These words of my master were like a voice from heaven to me: in an instant all my trepidation was turned into unutterable bliss, and I most reverently bowed myself with gratitude, unable to express my feelings, but by the overflowing of my eyes”. The amount of joy that Equiano must of felt to finally by the master of himself and not the slave to someone else was an incredibly powerful part of his…...

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