Euro Disneyland - a Case Study

In: Business and Management

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Xavier Institute of management & entrepreneurship | EURO DISNEYLAND CASE ANALYSIS | CCM ASSIGNMENT | | | Augustine George (32)Balaji Subramanian (36)David Aditya Solomon (45)Eliza Mathew (52)Eliza Pani (53) |

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EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
The given case “Euro Disneyland” elaborates about the issues faced by the Walt Disney Company when expanding to international borders. It first begins with the history of how Disneyland became so successful and expanded to various states across the country. It then describes about its first international success namely the Tokyo Disneyland and the factors affecting it.
The case then describes Disney’s decision of expanding into Europe. The various differences and problems faced in setting up of the amusement park.
Some of the major issues in setting up of the park were: * Cultural differences between the European and the American market * Environmental and location factors for setting up the amusement park * Financing and initial business plan were not analysed thoroughly in synchronisation with external economic factors * French labour laws were not taken into account while inducting the workforce * Management issues such as different attractions in the park
It was understood that the chief reason for Euro Disney’s failure was a lack of understanding of European culture on Disney’s part.
Based on the understanding from the case following recommendations were made: * A study in history and an understanding of the European market place would have enabled the Disney executives to anticipate many of its problems. * The mantra “think globally, act locally” would have helped Disney in better catering to the local needs. For instance, Disney does not sell alcohol within the parks and they tried to impose the same in Euro Disneyland. This was subject to opposition as French consider wine as…...

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