Figurative Language Versus Literal Language

In: Philosophy and Psychology

Submitted By vcampbe314
Words 906
Pages 4
Figurative Language versus Literal Language
Victoria Campbell
Philosophy 210 Critical Thinking
Michael Volpe
April 22, 2012

Sensory Perceptions
Sensory perceptions refer to your senses. The five senses are sight, touch, sound, smell and taste. Each sense has its own unique characteristic for each person. Sensory information can be both accurate and inaccurate. There are also factors that contribute to the accuracy of sensory data as well. Finally there is also an accepted methodology that complies with the standards of the scientific method. All of these things time in together with sensory perceptions. First is the accuracy or inaccuracy of sensory information. Sensory information can be both accurate and inaccurate. The short term element of memory is inaccuracy. Retaining impressions of sensory information after the actual event occurred from is referring to short term memory. It is received through the five senses of sight, hearing, smell takes and touch. It is in some sense a buffer for the stimuli. It can be retained for accuracy, but it actually does not last very long at all. An example would be putting your keys down and doing something and then forgetting where you put them. The stimuli which is detected through ourselves has the ability to be ignored or perceived. That factor can be both accuracy and inaccuracy. When it is ignored, it disappears almost immediately. When it is perceived, it will enter into the sensory memory. “This does not require any conscious attention and, indeed, is usually considered to be totally outside of conscious control” (Mastin, 2010). Information that will be useful further down the line is processed information through the brain. When information is perceived, it is then stored automatically and unhidden. Rehearsal does not work with this type of memory. Sensory memory decays as well as…...

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