John Cage

In: Film and Music

Submitted By kayan365
Words 1404
Pages 6
Regena Thomas
Professor: Heavner
Music 101 Appreciation 1 30 June 2011
John Cage John Cage was an American composer born in Los Angeles on September 5, 1912. As a child he took piano lessons and then studied composition with American composer Adolph Weiss. Cage studied for a short time at Pamona College, and later at UCLA with classical composer Arthur Schoenberg. There he realized that the music he wanted to make was different from the music of his time. Cage dropped out of college in his second year and head to Europe, during the early 1930s; he lives there for just eighteen months. According to the (Biography Base) it stated that it was there in Europe that he wrote his first pieces of music, but upon hearing them he didn't like them, and he left them behind on his return to America. Upon returning to the U.S., he studied in New York with Henry Cowell, finally traveling back to the West Coast in 1934 to study under Arnold Schoenburg. He began writing in his own musical system, often using techniques similar to those of Schoenberg. In 1937 he moved to Seattle and took a job accompanying a dance company.
Cage parents didn’t attend college his father earned a living being an inventor. Cage credits his father, being an inventor, and that influent is way in which he wrote music. “Cage described his mother as a woman with "a sense of society" who was "never happy." And as someone who “never enjoyed having a good time” (Nicholls 9).
John Cage was a great classical composer he was articulate and original in what he does. Cage would make music out of non-traditional instruments. While other composer included electronic instrumentation in their music. Cages type of music are compare to soundtrack in movies that as no plot. This type of music is known to many as the “musique concrete”. (Encyclopedia Britannica), states that “musique concrete” became cage’s…...

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