Lab 1 Physics

In: Science

Submitted By pumpkin03
Words 474
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Name
2) Which color vector (arrow) represents velocity and which one represents acceleration? How can you tell?
The green arrow represents velocity and the blue arrow represents acceleration. This is apparent because the velocity is reliant on speed and direction, while acceleration is reliant on the change in velocity.
3) Try dragging the ball around and around in a circular path. What do you notice about the lengths and directions of the blue and green vectors? Describe their behavior in detail below.
I noticed that the green arrow points the direction I am dragging and stays relatively the same while the blue arrow fluctuates rather rapidly at a perpendicular angle of the green arrow. The velocity or green arrow is always pointing in the direction I am moving and since I am going a constant speed it stays the same length. The blue arrow is showing the acceleration due to the rotation and it fluctuates rapidly due to me being unable to create a perfect speed and circle around a focal point.
4) Now move the ball at a slow constant speed across the screen. What do you notice now about the vectors? Explain why this happens.
When I move them in the same direction they are even/on top of each other. This happens because the velocity or direction and speed are constant making the acceleration constant.
5) What happens to the vectors when you jerk the ball rapidly back and forth across the screen? Explain why this happens.
The blue arrow goes with the green the shoots in the opposite direction shortly after. This happens because of the ball decelerating rapidly before traveling in the other direction and repeating the process
6) Now click on ‘Circular’ on the bottom. Describe the motion of the ball and the behavior of the two vectors. Is there a force on the ball? How can you tell? Be detailed in your explanations.
Since the speed is now constant, the velocity…...

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