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Mitigation Plan for Land Degradation

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Mitigation Plan for Land Degradation
Environmental issues are a major concern for everyone in the world. The environmental sustainability of natural resources is in danger. The consequences of human activities are affecting the quality or quantity of the air, the water, and the land. Each of these contributes to environmental balance and is vital for humans continued existence. Land, a terrestrial resource, has a role in the nutrient cycle of the environment, the growth of food sources, and the water quality. Soil consists of minerals, organic matter, and living organisms. Land degradation disrupts the ecological balance of the soil, which in turn threatens the sustainability of the environment.
Land degradation is the deterioration of soil by erosion; pollution; and land use changes. Erosion is the loss of soil. Less soil leads to limited plant growth. Plants hold the soil in place and play a part in the carbon cycle. Not only does limited plant growth expand erosion, but it also interrupts a process that is essential to the entire environment. Sediment from erosion affects the water quality and aquatic habitats. Run off into bodies of water can contain pesticides, fertilizer, or waste residue. Once contaminated the water supply infiltrates the area damaging every element of the environment. Soil pollution is the introduction of contaminants such as hazardous waste and chemicals into the ground. Pollution makes the soil useless. The land becomes unable to support life. Vegetation will not grow on polluted soil. Human exposure to certain contaminants can produce health issues some of which are lethal. Land use changes such as deforestation, urbanization, mining, and agricultural are also diminishing the soil. Deforestation wipes out forest land needed to maintain the environment. Flooding and the loss of ecosystems are results of urbanization. Mining strips the…...

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