Netscape Ipo

In: Business and Management

Submitted By blueflame
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Netscape’s IPO 1. Why has Netscape been so successful to date? What appears to be its strategy? What must be accomplished if it is to be highly successful going concern in the long run? 2. Does Netscape need to go public to satisfy its capital needs? What would you estimate might be the magnitude of its capital needs over the next 3 to 5 years? What sources other than the public equity market could be tapped to satisfy those needs? 3. Why, in general, do companies go public? What are the advantages and disadvantages of public ownership? 4. The case points out that the IPO market is sometimes characterized as a “hot issue” market, and that many IPOs are viewed in retrospect as having been “underpriced.” What might explain these phenomena? Should the Netscape board be concerned about underpricing? Why or why not? 5. Can the recommended offering price of $28 per share for Netscape’s stock be justified? In valuing Netscape, make the following assumptions: * Total cost of revenues remains at 10.4% of total revenues, * R&D remains at 36.8% of total revenues, * Other operating expenses decline on a strait-line basis from 80.9% of revenues in 1995 to 20.9% of revenues in 2001 (this would give Netscape a ratio of operating income to revenues close to Microsoft’s which is about 34%), * Capital expenditures decline from 45.8% of revenues in 1995 to 10.8% of revenues in 2001, * Depreciation is held constant at 5.5% of revenues, * Changes in net working capital of essentially zero, * Long-term steady-state growth of 4% annually after 2005, and * A long-term riskless interest rate of 6.71%. Given these assumptions, and starting from its current sales base of $16.625 million, how fast must Netscape grow on an annual basis over the next ten years to justify a $28 share…...

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