The Fighting Spirit of the Women Protagonists in the Two Novels, ‘a Doll’s House’ Written by Henrik Ibsen and ‘Yerma’ by Federico Garcia Lorca

In: English and Literature

Submitted By himan4ever
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There are hundreds of millions and billions of people existing in this world who have several ideas, each varying from the other. Each individual has his or her own way of treating his problems or dealing with their day to day situations of life. Some people are polite, some are helpful while some are arrogant. While there are some who touch extremes such as sacrificing their lives in order to secure the life of others. But in this research I would throw light on that group of people who sit quietly and do respond very politely and kindly to any kind of embarrassment or disgrace that they have faced in their life. These people although may seem to be quite harmless but they may just prefer to keep their thoughts private and would not like to socialize; but when someone interferes in their life to turn it upside down, is not tolerable by them, they may use drastic measures to ensure that the source of disturbance does not try to trouble them again. This sudden use of drastic measures is uncontrolled and in this rage the individual may harm the source of disturbance or himself to an extent that is immeasurable. This quality can be seen in the women protagonists of the two novels, namely Nora in ‘A Doll’s House’ and ‘Yerma’ in Yerma. The play ‘A Doll’s House’ is a melodrama of the nineteenth century. Henrik Ibsen has portrayed Nora Helmer, the female protagonist, as the doll of the house. In the play Nora has been constantly treated as a showpiece earlier by her father and now by her husband Trovald Helmer. She has extravagant spending habits. In this play the author Henrik Ibsen explores the change in human nature when he is exposed to the social environment (Nora). He notices the capacity of them to change. Nora at the end of the play is observed to undergo that change. She tries to discover who she is and undergoes a revolutionary change. In those times the…...

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