Why Are Developmental and Learning Theories Important

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Submitted By zandria1
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Why are developmental and learning theories important when it comes to using technology in teaching? Teachers has to know that every child learns differently, and they maybe on different developmental levels. Teacher must be knowledgeable and be able to apply the three ways that students learn visual, auditory, and or tactile/ kinesthetic. A visual learner needs to see what the teacher is teaching. Auditory needs to hear what the teacher is teaching and tactile / kinesthetic needs to touch what the teacher is teaching. Every teacher needs to know how each of her students learns so she will be able to accommodate those students. Yes, I do feel like it is important for teachers to incorporate a variety of technology to support the diverse learning needs because by accommodating those students is helping them to be successful with their academics, thus providing support technically and giving the students the opportunity to gain knowledge and feedback of understanding of lesson plans. Technology can encourage students to get into peer involvement, sharing ideas, and criticizing other students work also working in groups will provide student with more comprehensive knowledge during class. Teachers can use other avenues to create a meaningful learning experience by sending agenda’s and homework folders home with students. Parents can see what and how their child is doing and what they are learning in the classroom. The teachers can have the parents to initial the agenda so they will know the parents actually looked at the student’s agenda. Teachers can express to the student what is expected from them and in response the student will demonstrate that they have full understood the lesson. Technology can serve as a friend to the students and teachers, but teachers still will want students to think for themselves for the most part of…...

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