Why Did Germany Lose the War (16 Marks)

In: Historical Events

Submitted By snoopyamz
Words 1156
Pages 5
Why did the allies win/ Germany lose the war in 1918?

Some people would say that the fact that the USA entered the war in 1917 was the main reason why Germany lost the war in 1918. This is because when America entered the war they brought 1.15 million soldiers making the British army/ side much bigger and stronger than it had been before – which now meant that Germany were outnumbered. It also meant that the allies (British) had much better weapons as the Americans brought them over with them. The Americans had good weapons because they had a lot of money and could afford to buy new technology and the best of the best. However when America entered the war it took them a long time to build up their army where it was needed in France and by this time Russia retreated giving Germany the perfect opportunity to move more troops into France and once again gain power of the war. So America going into the war wasn’t important in Germany loosing the war because Germany ended up coming out on top because the Russians retreated making both sides almost equal again. This shows that this was not the main reason that Germany lost the war because at the end of this the Germans were equal with the allies.

Another reason which would contribute to Germany loosing the war would be because of Allies and technology. In 1918 the allies had amazing communications and transport systems, they also had really good strong machinery which didn’t break down – the allies also could/ did improve their machinery/ weapons regularly. The allies weapons were great they were accurate and smart in the way they had been designed e.g. Planes dropping bombs and big guns could create smoke screen so that they could begin an attack without being noticed until it was too late. The allies had motorized machine guns which were important because it was extremely rare for anyone to get past a machine gun…...

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