Why Did Hitler Loose the War

In: Historical Events

Submitted By josemail
Words 1578
Pages 7
Many aspects of World War Two have been the cause for debate for many years. Not only has the loss of Germany been discussed at great lengths, also have the reasons. It can be said that although much thought and fact has been taken into consideration when discussing Germany's loss as a whole; not as much attention has been given to that of the loss of Hitler as a man and a leader. Germany's loss of World War Two was not only a loss on behalf of the country as a whole, but a personal loss to Hitler. Why was this such a loss to Hitler? Why did he experience a personal downfall? How did he create his own demise? There are many reasons as to why this is so, but the fact that his ideas were behind the war is a reason why it was not only Germany's downfall, but Hitler's also. He was a man of influence in Germany; the timing was right, and he was in the hot spot. He was the leader of a highly populated European country, he wanted more for himself and for his people. He had ideas, he made decisions based on them. What were his ideas? What was behind them, what did he intend them to accomplish? Where did they lead, and how did this lead to a countrywide and worldwide loss, and even a personal loss? In discussing some of Hitler's ideas such as, lebensraum (which ties in with treaty issues), purity of the state of Germany and a zeal for his people and the desire to make changes for the betterment of his country; it will be seen that although his ideas might have been initally pure, they led to the war, the downfall of Germany and ultimately Hitler's own personal demise.

What were his ideas? What were his visions for a more pure Germany? What did he want for his people, for himself? Firstly, today, Hitler is seen as a white supremacist. He wanted all of Germany to be pure. Why was this so? In Germany at the time, the economic status of the country was not very…...

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