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Why Did a Campaign for Women's Suffrage Develop in the Years After 1870?

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Why Did a Campaign for Women's Suffrage Develop in the Years after 1870?
The most important reason for the development of a campaign for women's suffrage after 1870 is the number of reforms that were taking place. This is important because women were involved in many of these campaigns so they were encouraged that they would be able to win suffrage for themselves.
A campaign for women's suffrage developed in the years after 1870 due to several reasons. Women's necessity and craving for suffrage can partly explain the campaign, although it is also significant to consider why a campaign or fight was necessary, along with the reasons why this began after 1870.
The primary reason women wanted suffrage was because of their inferior status to men. They wanted to improve this. For example women were not allowed to attend schools or colleges limiting their chances of becoming someone important and well respected in society. Their job range was very limited they could either work in mills, farms or stay at home and look after the house however the poor women were unable to stay home to look after the house, as they had to work to bring in income to support their families. This led to a campaign for women's suffrage because they were not happy about being treated as slaves. The men were the slave-masters and the women were the slaves. They wanted to change this so they could live independently and not to rely on men. But this would only happen if they were able to get education so they could practice for careers that would improve there image in society and press the government to make changes so that women could be treated equally to men.
In addition, in 1901 there was a surplus of 1 million women meaning that there was a gender imbalance. This meant not all women were able to get married meaning that it was extremely difficult for them to survive on their own as they were unable to survive independently unlike men so this also must have encouraged many women to campaign for the equality of men and women. This links to my next point about women wanting the vote to seek freedom. They would actively be involved in the country's well being.
Women wanted freedom. Women wanted to be able to get good jobs and live on their own. They wanted to be able to choose any career they wanted rather than the government only allowing them to do a few jobs that weren't very good. Such as working as a teacher and in a factory which had very bad wages.
Also, women needed suffrage to protect the rights they had already gained. As if they didn't push for suffrage the government would feel that the women didn't care about their rights so they wouldn't really pay attention to the women campaigning so they needed to get the respect of the government.
A further point to consider is the effect of reforms. Women were encouraged by their involvement in other campaigns. For example, women were very actively involved in the 'Anti-slavery Movement' between 1760 and 1830. They got slavery abolished in the British Empire in 1833. This must have encouraged women to campaign because they would have believed that their campaign would be successful. They also were actively involved in the 'Mines Act' in 1842 that made it illegal for women and children under the age of 10 to work underground. These successes must have encouraged them along with many other successes in other campaigns they were actively involved.
These points are all in favor of why women wanted and needed to campaign. So know I will see why they had to actually campaign for suffrage rather than just getting it. The main reason women had to campaign was because the government who passes the laws felt that women are too emotional to be trusted with the vote. They are also not rational. The Politicians also believed that women and men have different responsibilities. Women are house-makers and mothers. It is the men who should debate and take difficult decisions. The Queen believed that women are pure and should be protected from the grubby world of politics. She also believed that men are suppose to protect the women so if they became heartless and disgusting human beings then how is man suppose to protect the weaker sex. The Queen's views are important because what she felt would be most popular amongst most women, as that would be the fashion. So most would agree with her. Another view that is important to point out is the view of the Upper-class gentlemen, as they would press the government for changes so what they would think would be what the government does. They believed that women would stop having children to further their careers and they also shared the view of the Politicians that women are not rational and that they are too emotional to have the vote. These views of important members of who have the main say in how the country is run was the reason on why women had to campaign to get suffrage.
The campaign developed then for many reasons. The main reason for the development of the campaign was because of the new trend of reform and challenge of traditional ideas in other areas such as 'Public Health Act' in 1848 which stated that no house would be able to built without a drain and toilet. This and many other acts really made the women feel that they could get suffrage. The 'Electoral Reform Act' in 1867 was the one of the biggest reasons for women believing that they could get suffrage because the franchise was extended to include many working-class men in towns. This must have really encouraged them to push for suffrage. These reforms angered women because it emphasized the inequalities and their lack of political power. These acts also showed that women could organize acts so they were capable of being part of politics that must have encouraged them.
In conclusion, I believe the most important reason for the development of a campaign for women's suffrage after 1870 is the number of reforms that were taking place. This is important because women were involved in many of these campaigns so they were encouraged that they would be able to win suffrage for themselves. Also the reforms improved women's conditions so they must have felt that they were getting through to the government so their campaigns were working. Women also believed that they were able to become politicians because of the number of successes they had got from acts they had organized. Furthermore, clear links can be made between the different factors, such as the views of the Politicians and the reform acts. This is because the views of the Politicians changed as the acts influenced the country to change the laws. Also, there is a link in the inferior status of women and the oppression of women. As women are treated as slaves and were unable to become doctors, politicians and bankers. They were unable to take up important jobs which would increase their image in society.…...

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